London’s Oldest Structure!

In the spring of 2010, archaeologists found six timber piles on the foreshore at Nine Elms which would have been part of a bridge to an island in the River Thames.

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Dick Turpin and the Flask pub!

The Flask pub goes back to an era when Highgate was a small village on the outskirts of London, with the oldest part (the stable block) dating back to 1663.

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The Monuments Men!

Two men who put the stone circle at Avebury on the map never met, but both had a passionate interest in the stone circle.

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‘Basher’ Dowsing of Suffolk!

William ‘Basher’ Dowsing (1596 – 1668) was born in Laxfield, Suffolk, was a puritan and made his name during the English Civil War (1642-49), a war that split the country between Parliament and Royalty.

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Hodge the Cat & Dr Johnson!

Dr Samuel Johnson (1709-1784) was a poet, essayist, literary critic and lexicographer. He is known for writing ‘A Dictionary of the English Language’, which took him 9 years, whilst he lived in Gough Square.

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The Wrens were the key!

One of the interesting things about visiting an attraction like Bletchley Park is seeing it evolve over that time, not only from investment, but also evolution in understanding what they did!

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Three Men in a Boat!

Jerome Klapka Jerome (1859 – 1927) was a writer, best known for the comic travelogue Three Men in a Boat, which was published in 1889.

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How old is Hyde Park?

Hyde Park was established by Henry VIII in 1536 when he took land from Westminster Abbey to be used as a hunting ground.

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What are Ley Lines?

Ley lines are ancient, straight 'paths' or routes in the landscape which are believed to have spiritual significance.

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The Jiu Jitsu Suffragette

Edith Margaret Williams was born in 1872 in Bath and become a ‘physical culture’ instructor specialising in gymnastics, boxing and wrestling.

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A Dockers Life

Many of the jobs created in London’s docks during the 19th century were badly paid. Others were seasonal or casual, which meant that people were only paid when work was available.

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Who was Mithras?

Mithraism was a mystery religion centred on the god Mithras. It was practised in the Roman Empire from the 1st to the 4th century CE.

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Police Posts!

Walking around the City of London, you might notice some light blue painted Police telephone posts.

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What is a ‘Davy Descender’?

Upon visiting Handel’s House Museum/Hendrix’s flat in London last Saturday, I noticed an odd looking object on the wall in the corner of Jimi Hendrix’s bedroom.

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